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08.07.2019 18:28

Several streets in Belarus are named after Uzbek heroes

Several streets in Belarus are named after Uzbek heroes
Committee on Interethnic Relations and Friendly Ties with Foreign Countries under the Cabinet of Ministers of the Republic of Uzbekistan hosted a solemn event timed to the Independence Day of Belarus and the 75th anniversary of the Minsk city’s liberation from the Nazi invaders.

Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary of the Republic of Belarus to the Republic of Uzbekistan Leonid Marinich noted that the Second World War was the most brutal and bloody war in the history of mankind. During the years of occupation by fascist troops, Belarus lost a third of its population. In those years, 260 death camps and other places of mass destruction of the local population were created by the enemy on the territory of the country. The Nazis burned about two hundred thousand Belarusian villages and destroyed many cities, but did not break the spirit of Belarusian people. The largest guerrilla movement in Europe was developed here, in which natives of Uzbekistan took part. The day of liberation of the city of Minsk, July 3, 1944, became a national holiday, the Independence Day of Belarus.

Chairman of the Committee on Interethnic Relations and Friendly Ties with Foreign Countries R. Kurbanov congratulated participants of the event on the Independence Day of Belarus and spoke about the cultural interaction of the two peoples.

According to him, the first Belarusians arrived in Uzbekistan in the 18th century. After the Tashkent earthquake of 1966, it was Belarus that was the first to respond to the call of Uzbek people and sent construction teams to Tashkent. Belarusian builders took an active part in restoration of dilapidated capital of Uzbekistan. In turn, during the Second World War, Uzbek families adopted thousands of Belarusian orphans.

A photo exhibition dedicated to the 75th anniversary of liberation of Belarus from the Nazi invaders was organized. Its visitors learnt about the fate and exploits of Uzbek soldiers who participated in the partisan movement that unfolded in Belarus during the Second World War. The memory of their courage and heroism was immortalized in photographs and historical documents, and streets of the country are named after them.

Roman Bondarchuk, UzA
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